The Big Bang Fair

Invisible Photography

We demonstrated the wonder of science and engineering with a photography exhibition the likes of which the world had never seen before: one where all of the photographs were invisible. Opened for The Big Bang Fair, ‘Dotography’ was officially the world’s smallest photography exhibition, featuring images printed to such a small scale that they were less the size of a grain of sand, totally invisible to the naked eye, and could only be seen through a special microscope.

Upon entry to the exhibition in Birmingham, visitors could have been forgiven for thinking they were looking at dozens of empty photo frames. But once armed with a hi-spec handheld microscope that clipped onto the back of a regular smartphone, visitors uncovered a world of miniaturised photography.

The unique photography exhibition was designed to inspire young people to consider a future in STEM. Among the 22 pictures on display were iconic photographs that celebrated landmark moments from the world of STEM: including Marie Curie at work in her laboratory in 1900, Albert Einstein with fellow theoretical physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer in 1950 and Neil Armstrong taking mankind’s first ever steps on the Moon in 1969.

In addition to the historic STEM milestones, the gallery featured a number of original submissions depicting the wonder of STEM in our everyday lives. These images were taken by people in the STEM community, school students and celebrities with a penchant for the world of science and engineering, including The Great British Bake-Off finalist and engineer Andrew Smyth (who supplied an image of a Rolls Royce jet engine cake), wildlife expert Liz Bonnin (a picture of a Galapagos fern), and actors Ben Miller (a picture of his child’s Lego engineering skills) and Lucy Porter (a baby bump selfie).

There was nothing small about the media response to Dotography, with over 50 pieces of coverage including the likes of BBC News, ITV News, First News, Daily Star, BT News, Campaign and Yahoo.

Following on from the success of Dotography, it will be popping up again at this year’s Big Bang Fair as a means of allowing even more kids to enjoy the experience.  

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.

Visitors attend world’s first “invisible” photography exhibition - featuring images so small that they require a microscope to be seen. Entitled “Dotography”, the exhibition was organised by The Big Bang Fair 2018 to raise awareness of the largest celebration of STEM for young people in the UK. The collection includes famous images of scientific importance and original photos submitted by celebrities, the STEM community and local school children. Dotography runs until 28th January at the Birmingham Bullring Link Street, Unit K2.